Guidelines and requirements

 The reading material and some suggestions cf. below.

 For reference, look at these very detailed resources:

English for Academic Purposes http://www.uefap.com/

Advise for Academic Writing http://www.utoronto.ca/writing/advise.html 

The Writing Centre http://www.wisc.edu/writing/Handbook/

Citation http://www.library.ualberta.ca/guides/citation/index.cfm

              and here http://www.citationonline.net/9-home.asp

Cf. a list of references to other resources http://www.usingenglish.com/links/English_for_Special_Purposes/Academic_English/

The course is designed for the future specialists in law. It aims to show students the historical roots of legal science and to unfold some methodological problems that anyone working in the field of legal studies most frequently encounters. This is the major rationale for the course. Besides, my intention is to broaden student’s cultural erudition and familiarize them with recent advances in the philosophy of law.

Lectures shortly outline the major problems of the philosophy of law and the works of the most important contemporary philosophers of law, while for seminars I have chosen a different approach:  each of them is dedicated to a specific subject, important from the poin of view of legal theory. Student’s work will consists of (1) Individual reading of the assigned literature and (2) preparing of a final essay on a subject chosen according to the instructor’s recommendations.

The working language of the course is English.